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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Repairing my EOS front passenger window lifter/regulator (1 day).

Part 1 of 2 parts

I recently had my front passenger window fail. I put this problem in the same serious fault category as a CC top failure. It could leave my wife alone at night very vulnerable, the security of the car is compromised and it could fill up with water. Fortunately I was sitting in my driveway rolling down the window when I detected a hiccup and a sound of stretching wire. The glass seized half way, then after several attempts it went down more where it stayed stuck. I could still hear the motor 'tick' but no movement.

First thing is the EOS rescue kit - a full size breathable car cover to keep out the rain and snow. Then some contemplation. The VW window lifter/regulator is based on a tensioned wire frame held inside the door cavity. My symptoms indicated a mechanical failure and not an electronic control module problem. In common with most VAGS, the EOS window lifter regulator design uses a frame with pulleys at each corner, strung with 1.5mm steel (stainless?) wire. Each vertical frame carries a glass clamp fastened to the wire. Each end of the wire is returned and fixed to a nylon drum with grooves. As the drum is turned by a motor, wire leaves in one direction and enters from the other. thus the drum is always kept fully loaded with wire. The wire tension in the frame is huge and set by a plastic plunger on the right of the drum. This plunger is self compensating. As the wire tensions, the plunger moves to keep that tension. Rather like self adjusting rear parking brakes.

I explain this because it creates a problem if you want to dismantle their assembly. Diagram 'Regulator wire path' shows the arrangement. I shall now describe how I got access to the VW window lifter/regulator. Where possible I've annotated actual photos. These are the stages of a remove and re-install. The last stage setting up the window glass alignment is the most important stage. I have ideas about how the system works but I haven't stripped a motor or controller to prove them. These window systems are designed to stop if fingers get trapped. This would probably require a motor torque sensor - usually curent sensing. I think this is the basis of the operation. Motor over current is sensed at the top and bottom extremes of glass travel. They could have used a fancy stepper motor, but I suspect for cheapness they use a dc motor with a spindle revolution sensor. Knowing the two extremes of height and the count from the motor spindle the controller can move the glass small distances at the top (drop from roof seal) and at the bottom (above service position). My window drops and operation were fine before, so I only suspect mechanical seizure. If their system incorporates torque sensors then in theory the wire moving the glass should never overtighten and break.

Steps I followed:

1: Remove the outer door panel trim.
2. Remove the Inner panel (14 screws) and motor.
3. Remove the window glass
3. Remove the square frame lifter/regulator unit.
4. Buy new lifter/regulator
5. Fit and repeat reverse of 3 to 1.
6. Carry out basic (electronic) settings getting glass to lower/raise, drop to service position and drop to door open.
7. Carry out the physical window adjustments for glass height to roof seal, clearance glass-glass to rear side window. Inclination (getting the glass straight)
8. Optional extra.

1. Photo 'Trim start here1' shows the door handle trim removed to reveal 2 screws. There's a further screw in the lock release cavity. First gently prise up the cover with a plastic tool (I use mine a lot!) Next move on to remove 3 screws at the bottom of the outer door panel shown in 'Bottom edge 3 screws annotated2'. Now look at photo 'Outer panel peg locations annotated3' This shows roughly where pegs marked X are fitted into the steel door skin. Working carefully with a plastic wedge starting at the bottom rear, start pulling away at the panel. There are 6 pegs. They should release their claw into the steel panel when a wedge tool is slid in. In practice some will just break. Don't worry, just order up a set of 6 pegs with the other parts.

When the panel is hanging loose from the top, carefully wiggle and lift it vertically over the top channel. Warning: Arrange blocks to support the bottom edge of the door panel. Do not let it dangle on the short wiring loom and connector!! The lock release wire and window switch connector are still attached, so remove these when you have sufficient space to get your hand behind.

2. Now you should be staring at the inner cover seal, fixed by 14 bolts marked Y and Z on photo 'Inner panel how to remove annotated4'. Remove the wiring plugs and release the loom clips. There's a large oval shaped grommet towards the front through which all the wires can pass. The cover has a decent rubber edge seal which tends to stick. I greased mine with silicone grease before replacing the cover. Carefully work around the edges of the cover with a pallet knife to release the seal. Now you should be able to move it about an inch away from the steel door skin. The grommet carrying the door latch release wire (yellow sleeve) can be pushed back through the hole. Now there's a horrible nasty nylon 'claw' that sits behind the panel to the left of the white label in the photo.

This really is a piece of Sh*t. It's locked into the lock mechanism. The lower claw has a locating peg and if you gently lift this away with a screwdriver it will separate. To make things easy (I mean hard!), the top claw has a different squeeze type release for its peg. You could spend 15 minutes releasing this thing before you can lift away the inner panel. I had wondered about removing the two lock bolts in the door end. But they are 12 point star and NOT 6 point Torx bolts. When you lift away this cover you will be able to see the lifter/regulator frame with motor attached. The motor should now lift off the 3 pegs.

3. You can now see the 2 black vertical frames which carry the sliding glass lifters. Each lifter has a glass clamp and 1 bolt. To remove the glass you must be able to motor the glass to a position about 1/3 down from the top where you can get a Torx driver on each bolt. In my case, these bolts were obscured by the door panel and the whole lot was seized fast. At the bottom of the frame in the center is the moulding carrying the winding drum. I attempted to prise mine out, but there was horrendous tension. It came out pretty butchered and destroyed. If you are faced with a seized mechanism your best bet is to cut the wire then push up the glass to get to the clamp bolts, remove the bolts and lift the glass out. The front Torx clamp bolt is Loctited, the rear is not. My rear clamp bolt was loose!

The frame uprights are held by bolts at top and bottom. Access is by removing the peel back covers in the top of the door skin photo 'access to lifter frame bolts (4) annotated5, and 2 black rubber grommets in the bottom photo 'Track fasteners behind 2 caps under door annotated6. Once these bolts are removed, the whole assembly can be removed from the door cavity.

4. In my case the winder drum was seized. There was fraying of the wire around the drum which helped seizure, but I can't say if this was damage I caused trying to get the drum out to remove wire tension my extracted winding drum is photo 'Winder drum seized and forcibly extracted annotated7'. Their wire is 1.5mm (stainless) which is sourceable. But they use crimp wire stops. Getting this assembly back together with the right tension and stops set correctly is something of a Rubiks Cube problem. Just go buy a replacement.

5. Putting it all back: Pretty much a reverse procedure with some additions.

Since I saw a lot of black crud had entered the drum and back plate assembly (but nowhere else). I don't know if this has come from their cable lining or from the door cavity. I thought I'd fit a plastic cover over the drum carrier. This covers up a lot of gaps and holes. See photo 'Window motor dust cover8' and 'Crud in my window winder drum annotated9'. This was cut from 1200gm polyethylene sheet and stuck with double sided tape to the nylon drum carrier.

Gotchas! When sliding in the glass, use a pallet knife to work the seals around the glass. Look inside the door with a flashlight at the front vertical seal and make sure that is correctly feathered either side of the glass as you move it down. A new lifter frame comes with the glass clamps set about 1/3 down, so there is no problem accessing the bolts. I decided to add blue Loctite to both my glass clamp bolts, since the original left bolt was found loose. IMPORTANT: The glass clamp bolts pull the clamps down directly on the glass through a rubber gasket. The correct torque setting is 8 Nm. The correct torque can only be achieved by tightening in stages, leaving then re-tightening. Don't tighten in one hit!

Now you are ready to replace the black inner cover. I smeared silicone grease around the seal on mine. You have to first engage the awful nylon lock claw at the rear of the cover. I found it marginally easier to push it on the lock assembly and feed on the panel. A real bit of jiggery pokery because you have to feed the lock release cable and grommet through its hole at the same time.

Now you can get the wiring loom through the oval hole, tighten down the 14 bolts and start clipping on the connectors and loom clips. REMEMBER IGNITION OFF. The connector with the bright yellow end is an airbag sensor!!


Part 2 follows:
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Part 2 of 2 parts

6. Do not fit the door outer trim at this stage, there is important testing and adjustment to do! The controller no longer knows where the maximum top and bottom of the glass travel is and needs to be taught. I had problems with several procedures I looked at for re-phasing the windows. As long as you know how the window should work, you will know if the system has learned or not. With the door open, put a screwdriver shaft in the lock claw and force it down to simulate a locked door (which is open). Rest the outer door panel on end and plug in the window switch connector. Turn on the ignition. Allow the glass to lower to its normal low position. Then within 5 seconds raise the glass to the normal high (non-rollback) position. Hold the window switch up in this position for 5 seconds. Take the glass back down to the normal low and hold the switch again for 5 seconds. Now check the rollback functions. With the glass fully raised. First remove the screwdriver to open the door latch - the glass should roll down. Then operate the switch holding at the end to check the glass will roll to the service low position (when the edge of the glass is fully clear of the wiper seals. If this all works the basic electronic window settings are done.

7. Next comes the physical settings which are most important. The glass must sit between two marks when it enters the roof seal see photo ' Glass top edge marks annotated10', and should leave a 9mm +-1 mm gap to the rear side window glass. In addition the glass must sit correctly inclined (kind of horizontal!). First of all measure what you are starting with. My new lifter frame came out with a 1 mm squif, 5mm too low at the top marks and a 3mm gap to the rear side window glass - so everything to adjust!

To increase the glass height, the adjuster screws on each lifter have to be set. One full turn clockwise is approx 1mm INCREASE in height. The screws sit BEHIND the vertical frame supports. you cannot see them from the front. Motor the glass down to the bottom service position and see photo 'Track fasteners behind 2 caps under door annotated 6'. Check with a flashlight you can see the head of a T25 Torx screw. Make sure the driver is properly keyed in - don't strip this Torx! Turn each adjuster screw clockwise by the same amout to reach the spec. height. Move one side more or less to put in inclination. With the door closed, motor the window to the roof seal and check the seal edge is within the window markings.

Next is the front to back position alignment. My glass sitting with a 3mm gap to the rear side glass needed to go to the front by 6mm to meet spec. See photo 'Glass horizontal and inclination annotated11' and 'Glass horizontal adjustment annotated12'. Remove the 2 plastic plugs shown and motor the glass up so the clamp bolts sit centrally in the apertures. Slacken the glass clamps and push the glass to get the correct gap to the rear side glass. 1/2 tighten the clamp bolts. Now go back and repeat the other checks. When the horizontal alignment is correct, torque the 2 clamp bolts to 8Nm in stages and recheck. It will probably be necessary to 're-sync' the driver side window after all this - check the sunroof too. Finally check the CC roof function. There are likely to be fault DTC's stored after this work, so you'll have to do a diagnostics system reset.

8. Optional Extras: I've had problems with water leaking into the door skins and pouring out the door drains before driving away. Whilst the window glass was out I had a good look at the horizontal glass wiping blade seal and the vertical seal. I didn't think much of either, but I was surprised there was no join across the 2 seals. This would mean water could run along the top edge of the wiper seal and empty inside the door. I decided to put some silicone between the 2 seals as in photo 'Seal junction of horizontal & vertical glass seals annotated13'.

A second thing of curiosity is the bottom bolts for the glass tracks have oval holes allowing the window glass to be moved forwards and back. That allows the glass to be moved further towards the outer blade seal.

There are a couple of extra photos not directly referred to in this text.

ADDENDUM

Front right door (UK Driver side)

Removing the right side (UK Driver) door card is slightly different with the possibility of damaging the switch panel door handle recess trim which has to be removed and the wiring connectors unplugged. Mark the connectors that appear the same so you put them back in the same sockets.

Underneath this switch panel handle recess there are lots of pegs clustered around the recess itself marked 'P' on the photo. In addition there are metal push clips at points around the edge. IMPORTANT lift/prise the handle recess panel upwards only with no sideways force, working first at the edges surrounding the recess, since the underside has the pegs and the longest peg is easy to break.

Releasing the horrible nasty claw I referred to in section 2 to allow the card to be pulled away. Remove the 2 bolts in the rear of the door frame which hold the lock mechanism. This allows the claw and its rod to be moved and gives more space to get a tool behind and underneath the claw to release it. On each nylon peg top and bottom at the back there is a springy plastic locking strip. Push both strips inwards towards the cabin and the locating claw should pull out to release the door card.

Removing the motor unit: There are 3 white nylon pegs holding the motor to the support. use a 10mm ring spanner to close and release each peg.

The rear sliding glass lifter has a round nylon insert which clips into a hole in the window glass. When both lifter bolts are removed the glass may still be held by the circular insert in the rear lifter and cannot be pulled upwards. Work your hand around the back of this lifter and spread the glass clamp with a plastic wedge to open it and free the glass from the insert.

Grease the threads on each window lifter adjuster well and turn the screw a few times with the Torx driver to ensure they run nice and free for later adjustment. Return the adjusters to about mid way.

Dash faults. If you are running the window motor with the airbag sensor disconnected or turn on the ignition with the motor plugs disconnected, a lot of DTC's (Diagnostic Trouble Codes) will get stored. Air bag trouble codes and airbag light 'on' will not go away after making the sensor connections. In addition you may get a 'seek service' message on the display. Do not despair! VCDS will clear all the trouble codes and the airbag light WILL go out. If you do not have VCDS then have the dealer do the reset.

Sorry, can't add more photos to this edited post, look for them on Part 1 post.

Voxmagna 21 December 2011 edited 9th July 2013
 

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Hi Vox,
yet another detailed and very informative write up, I'll refer to some parts of this next year when I come to remove the door card to fir door warning lights so thanks yet again for sharing.
I actually stood and watched an auto glass repair man do this on some poor soul's EOS in Wetherby and bloody hell, he earned his money on that call out.:eek: I walked away after about 20 mins and came back about 90 mins later and the poor sod was still struggling with it so you should congratulate yourself for getting it sorted.:cool:
Keep 'em coming, I'm a geek for this stuff.:D
Regards,
John
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi John,

I saw the red warning glass in the bottom of the door cavity, but couldn't work out what lamp could fit there or where it should be wired to the interior light system.

I did wonder if all they had put in was a non-illuminated red reflector?

Have you any info /part numbers on a lamp housing and wiring points to make this light up, is that the way it works on higher end EOS models?

Having done the door card thing, I can't imagine how a roadside repair could be done without some hidden damage to the plastic fixings and the lock claw. But then most wouldn't realise.

One thing I missed off the post was when I got the new regulator assembly, I hung it up in the garage, went around the wires, wire outer sheaths and the winder drum with my Krytox filled hypo. Left it overnight to drain through. It can't be a bad thing having those parts running in ptfe.

Merry Xmas

Vox
 

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http://www.my-gti.com/2240/adding-door-warning-lights-to-the-volkswagen-golf-and-jetta-rear

http://www.mk6golfgti.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,124.0.html

Hi Vox, take a look at these two links, they're Golf based but the info is all pertinent to our cars or very close. I think there's info on Vortex too but can't find it right now. It's a simple mod once the door cards are off so I'll be trying it when the weather turns mild again.
On the first site there's also a mod to add mirror-mounted puddle lights which is also a thing to consider once the cards are off.

Have a good Christmas,
Regards,
John
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for sharing.

First off would be to see if the EOS controller can be re-programmed for those coding bytes, because we only have 2 doors. I'll look see when Xmas is out of the way.

Even with the lifter regulator installed, there should be plenty of space to get to the bottom of the door cavity.

If you do it, a 'how to' for the EOS would be much appreciated.
 

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Hi you both seem to really know your stuff. I am new to this forum & looking for some advice my passenger window died today & I have seen a post from the US on an extended warranty for the regulators do you know if this applies in the UK ?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I read that there were issues on the VAG window lifters in general and some were getting theirs fixed inside the 3 year factory warranty period.

My EOS is now outside that and I never bothered with VW's Mondial extended warranty, since they wouldn't cover roof seal leaks, where most problems might be expected to occur.

I think you should talk to your UK VW Dealer. Seeing how the window lifter is put together I can't imagine a magic wand solution to making them reliable. There are two types of problems - electrical/electronic and the seized winder drum kind like I had.

Remember, on a 2 door car like the EOS, the front window glasses will be heavier than on the 4 door saloons, and the EOS window lifters take a hammering in terms of operations because the roof opening sequence is taking down the windows every time the roof is operated. On most non cabriolets, it is usually only the driver window that gets most use.
 

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Hi, thanks for the DIY.
I come as a VW Scirocco user, but it seems to be the same setup as the EOS.

However, the air bag sensor seems to be a critical working procedure. Do you plug it back after you remove the inner cover seal so you can turn on ignition so you can run the motor in case you need to during work (for example for aligning?)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You should always be careful using information from the internet and bear in mind that 'procedures' intended to be helpful to some with experience, may not necessarily contain all the information for somebody else expecting every step numbered leaving nothing out.

Yours is a different VW model and even within models there are different equipment specifications.

I do remember seeing the brightly colored connectors (yellow?) and thinking those are probably for the side impact air bag sensiing and you should always be careful with them, particularly if the battery is still connected or the ignition is switched on. These connectors are highly visible and you should be in no doubt that they are something special.

Disconnecting an airbag sensor plug when the system is live and active could potentially allow the unconnected wire to pick up static. Therefore, it is never a good idea to do that. Also the car diagnostics will put up an airbag fault on the dash.

Only from memory now, but I think on most other cars I have worked on, the airbag dash warning will self clear when the connection is remade - BUT YOU SHOULD NEVER BREAK OR MAKE AIRBAG CONNECTIONS WHEN THE IGNITION IS TURNED ON. Any faults even after self clearing may still show up in the ECU fault log and need to be cleared with vagcom. Similar things happen if the ABS modulator is replaced or work is done on the steering electrics.

It is a while since I did mine and the only thing I remember is having the wires connected and the door panel propped up so they would not get stretched too much. There was not that much alignment to do. After I replaced the window lifter/regulator, the window glass was very close to the correct marks on the glass, but with a slight 'tilt' which I corrected.
 

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Thanks again voxmagna.

I have Elsawin, so i have detailed instructions on how to do it for my specific vehicle.
However this diy is a really nice complement.

In case i get a fault, i have VCDS (Vagcom) and actually access to original VAS but not connected to VW's servers.

I'm not affraid of getting a fault, i can always clear it.

In my instructions, it says i must disconnect battery, then disconnect airbag sensor and reverse to install, connect airbag, TURN ON IGNITION THEN CONNECT BATTERY with no one in the vehicle!!

However, with battery disconnected, how i can run the window motor when i need to align and adjust?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have the same resources, but I also work with and do what I understand.

Airbag systems are not usually active when the ignition is off. If the battery is disconnected and left that way for 1/2 hour I cannot see the airbag system being active either. But the circuit that fires the squibs often has stored electrical charge and they always say when removing an airbag itself (NOT the sensor) to make sure the airbag connector has a short circuit across the terminals. This is to stop your mate with the high power CB driving past and getting sufficient voltage to fire the squib.

The same is true when you disconnect a sensor. If the airbag system is not powered by ignition on there should be no problem. However, stored voltages inside the airbag unit may keep it active for some time. The sensor connector and wires will be the most sensitive to stray voltages or your mates high power CB when the connector is broken and left floating about open circuit, so that is where you take care. One repair operation that really needs serious thought on the airbag side is electric arc welding.

I am pretty sure the crash sensor wires are just long enough to be connected, you may need to unclip some wire from the door skin to get more length. I am pretty sure I did not run the window motor or turn on the ignition without that plug being connected. That is because I hate seeing all the warning lights coming on, only to wonder if vagcom will do a reset. Another thing you can do is to disable the passenger side airbag from inside the glove box which is one less airbag to fire off! On the EOS the airbag system also fires the rollover head protection and seat belt tensioning, so there are a lot of things that could go bang and give a big headache.

TURN ON IGNITION THEN CONNECT BATTERY with no one in the vehicle!!
At first that seems a strange thing to do. I suspect the reason is as follows: By turning on the ignition without the battery, you are making a current path to discharge voltages which may be stored in the airbag control module. From memory, these things include large capacitors which hold charge to fire the squibs. By turning on the ignition first and leaving a few minutes, the capacitors can discharge.

I guess VW are covering themselves by saying have nobody in the vehicle when the battery is reconnected. But this is all a bit strange because I have batteries replaced in many of my vehicles and the shop turns off the ignition, replaces the battery and then leaves me to recode the radio.

Go with what you feel is right because I think accidental firing of airbags is not that common unless you start shorting out wires and pins in connectors whilst the system is active. If you can mate the crash sensor connector and still adjust the glass you should have no problems. I cannot be certain, but if the airbag system warning light comes on (crash sensor disconnected) I think the system goes into fault mode locking out all the airbags and squibs from firing.
 

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Thanks again voxmagna.

And here goes, it seems i don't need power to operate the window. It says in one of my instructions.

If the work step cannot be carried out because there is a fault with the electric window motor, remove motor to
slide window down.
So i can just operate it manually.

=)
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Not sure what you mean because at some point you have to carry out the window lifter reset procedure and make sure when you release the door lock to open it, the glass drops by the correct amount. The motor has to be operating for that. But Ah, yours is not an EOS and we EOS owners have additional window functions to drop the glass away from the roof seal before opening the door.

That is the problem coming to the EOS forum with a non EOS model. Everybody can get confused.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I added an addendum to my procedeure as I have now had the RIGHT drivers side (UK) door card off and all the innards stripped out. Now you always have to be careful with airbags and if you want to go the way of VW you would never start the job!

Once you fit the window motor, the only way to test the regulator system (best to do it before replacing the door card) or get the lifter plates to the correct level to insert the bolts, is to power the motor and glass and go through the height reset procedure to make sure everything is o.k. You can leave the final adjustment of glass height till later, but you need to check the glass will move between the two extremes with the switch and will drop when the door latch is opened. I propped up the door card (damn they could have made that motor harness longer!) and just connected the motor power connector (with the red tab) and the vertical control connector (with the violet locking bar).

As soon as you turn on the ignition, the airbag warning light will come on because the SIP side sensor is disconnected. As far as I am concerned, the system should now be inactive. In addition a 'seek service' message will come up. During testing with various door connectors disconnected a lot of DTC's will be stored. These including the window system and airbag faults, can all be cleared with VCDS or take the car to the Stealer to clear them. Curiously, VCDS did not clear the service message with SRI, but it went away when I followed the VAG user manual procedure for a 'non dealer' service message reset.

If you are still nervous about setting off airbags and trying to understand VW instructions, then you might be better off paying the Stealer to do the work!
 

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A big thanks again to voxmagna for his detailed instructions which were a great help to me recently. Concerning the nylon claw, I watched this video were a regulator was taken out of a VW Beetle convertible http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCzYl4vqmJ4. It was recommended that the door latch and cylinder were removed and so, with a borrowed 12 point spline I followed the instructions. This definitely makes life a lot easier! Don't forget to mark the bottom bolts which will help when re-positioning the new regulator. A tip I used to help align the window back in was to tape around the clamps that hold the window in the regulator before I removed it. Also tape across the the front and rear windows a few times marking it with a horizontal line. Match these up with the new regulator in place and your onto a winner! Hope this is of some use.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Glad you got through it because it is a frustrating repair operation to go through, but you save a lot of dealer labor time and have no fear doing it again. (the second front regulator will soon fail too!).

I don't know anybody yet that has followed my post to replace the wire. Now you have the old unit to reverse engineer and experiment on like I did, you will understand why most must buy the expensive part complete. The EOS window regulator is the worst example of an expensive part engineered to be thrown away to landfill that I have seen.
 

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My first post, so first of all hello!

I just want to resurrect this thread as my sister in law has recently bought an Eos and the window stuck in the down position yesterday and has asked for my help, so I am after some advice please!

My sister-in-law bought a VW Eos yesterday and the passenger side window is stuck in the down position meaning the car is obviously unsecure, but also the roof won't go down.

I've broken down the door - I've removed the door card, plastic skin etc and think that I have discovered the problem to be the cables have frayed and siezed the winder drum.

I need to try and find a replacement part today so have phoned round all the local scrappys, and the closest they have is a Y-reg passat. This isn't going to work is it?

The closest Eos is 105 miles from me, so that's not an option, so are there any other models that share the same window mechanism as the Eos? Or is the Eos unique due to the folding roof?

Any help or advice greatly appreciated!

Thanks,

Nick
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The EOS window regulators are unique to the EOS model. There is no other VW model substitute so I doubt you are going to repair yours in a day.

The window regulators are only linked to the roof system in as much as they have to be working normally without faults. The first part of the top down sequence is to lower the windows to clear the seals, otherwise I think the roof system is (quite rightly) prevented from operating. That is an interesting point, particularly if you were unfortunate to have the top down and the window regulator failed before you raised it. :eek:

I can't see where your crisis urgency is on the roof, because a roof locked in the up position still leaves the car safe and driveable. But an EOS with a faulty window regulator and roof down which will not raise, is an EOS that can fill up with rain water. :eek:

On the security front, you have the door card removed and can see what is in there and how the window glass is raised by the wire?

Assuming the wire is frayed and jammed inside the drum, what you do is cut the wire either side of the drum whilst supporting the glass. Then close the door and lift the glass high enough to fit in the top seal groove. Then either cut two pieces of timber the right length, or secure the glass through the two clamps with fence wire to a nearby fixed part to hold up the window glass inside the door cavity, then temporarily replace the door card. From now on when you open that door you will have to be careful to let the raised glass clear the top seal lip without damage. Put masking tape over the door switches for that door glass to remind you NOT to operate them and don't operate the roof. When you unlock the car, the door glasses will drop and the motor on the jammed side may still try to work but should remain locked out.

Your EOS is temporarily driveable with a secure door glass. You then either bite the bullet of around £140 dealer price for a new EOS regulator or drive around for your used one. Personally, I would be sceptical fitting a used regulator unless from a very new EOS because the wire will have had a lot of use and may be rusty like yours. It will not be long before you will need to replace the other front door glass regulator, so factor that in. Wives don't like parking or driving home late at night with a door glass stuck open.

I wrote this from my head so don't blame me if it doesn't work!
 
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